Article- Invest More in Education

The World Bank’s analysis of cross-country data on human capital indicates that Uganda is underinvesting in the future productivity of its citizens. Uganda is ranked among the countries in the lowest quartile of the Human Capital Index (HCI) distribution, with an index slightly lower than the average for the Sub-Saharan Africa region, and below what would be predicted by its income level. Uganda’s low ranking in the HCI is mainly due to the country’s low education outcomes.

Read More
Tusome Africa
A big thank you!

Thanks to the generous efforts of Tusome Africa’s supporters, there are children in one of Uganda’s poorest regions that now have greater access to books, literacy and numeracy activities and other essential educational aides.

Read More
Tusome Africa
We need to talk – how school debate clubs are driving pupil performance

Since Tusome Africa introduced debate clubs in each of the ten schools it works with, pupil engagement has increased. With discussion topics ranging from urbanisation to environmental issues, the weekly debate clubs have given children the chance to imagine their futures beyond school, opening them up to new perspectives and possibilities. 

Meet some of Tusome Africa’s outstanding orators: 

Read More
Tusome Africa
A year on – it’s just the beginning

A lot has happened in the past year at Tusome Africa, more than I could have imagined. We’ve grown in size, both in terms of staff and volunteers, and also in terms of the schools that we work with. I was delighted to have an opportunity to visit five schools in January to see some of the work that the team have been doing in Uganda within the past year. Despite the fact that it was the school holidays, the head teachers met me and talked me through the changes that Tusome is enabling on the ground and how this is supporting them to achieve very tough school improvement programmes.

Read More
Tusome Africa
An African vision, by Africans for Africa! Tusome Africa is Born.

I was driving home from a friends’ funeral when I stopped by the roadside to buy some food, as is usually the case on a journey like this. Women and children run to the car and try to sell their foodstuff. I observed this little boy of about four or five years stood quietly at the back of the pushing crowd, wearing an oversized school uniform, holding a basket of passion fruit. He wasn’t saying anything. He stood away from the pushing crowd elegantly balancing a large basket of passion fruit in front of him. I got out of the car and approach the little boy, and asked him how much the basket of passion fruit cost. He responded simply “3,500 shillings” ($1) and he quickly added that he would also give me a few extra pieces of passion fruit if I bought two baskets for 7,000 shillings ($2).

Read More
Tusome Africa